Working Group on Solar Eclipses

The tasks of the International Astronomical Union’s Working Group on Solar Eclipses include:

a) Working with the general public, providing materials and links to explain why eclipses are interesting to watch, how to observe them safely, and what science is being studied; and
b) Working with professional astronomers from around the world, to help coordinate their expeditions to total solar eclipses, including helping them work with customs in various countries about the temporary importation of scientific equipment.

Forthcoming Total Solar Eclipse – Saturday, December, 4, 2021

Preliminary Prediction of the December 4, 2021 eclipse corona at www.predsci.com/eclipse2021

December 4 charter flight package for Airbus 321 to view the eclipse from the air East of Punta Arenas, Chile

http://nicmosis.as.arizona.edu:8000/ECLIPSE_WEB/TSE2021/TSE2021WEB/EFLIGHT2021.

Xavier Jubier’s Google map (clickable; zoomable):

http://xjubier.free.fr/en/site_pages/solar_eclipses/xSE_GoogleMap3.php?Ecl=+20211204&Acc=2&Umb=1&Lmt=1&Mag=1&Max=1&Map=ROADMAP

Fred Espenak’s map at http://EclipseWise.com

http://www.eclipsewise.com/oh/ec2021.html#SE2021Dec04T

http://www.eclipsewise.com/solar/SEdisk/2001-2100/SE2021Dec04T.gif

Jay Anderson: weather/cloudiness info: http://eclipsophile.com (see our new book, Peterson Field Guide to Weather (2021), at pasachoff.com)

Previous Total Solar Eclipse- Monday, December 14, 2020

Most Recent Annular Solar Eclipses—2020 and 2021

Astronomy Magazine article for the June 2021 annular eclipse

How to View a Solar Eclipse Safely

Future Eclipses

2020 Eclipses

2019 Eclipses

August 21, 2017, Eclipse

Basic Eclipse Materials

Previous Eclipses

Reference Materials

Eye Safety and Solar Filters

Sources of Partial-Eclipse-Viewing Filters

Eclipse Resources: Science, Observing, History