Professors' Picks

Williams professors select the best of what's come across their desks so you can stay up-to-date with the latest research, opportunities, and resources.

Prof. Caprio recommends: The Implication of Climate Change for Financial Stability

Financial regulators have been increasing their attention to climate change and the risks it poses to the financial system. See the latest report from the Financial Stability Board, “The Implication of Climate Change for Financial Stability.”

Prof. Caprio recommends: Ph.D. opportunity in Financing the Green Transition in Developing Countries

Ph.D. opportunity in “Financing the Green Transition in Developing Countries”. The program is a collaboration between the Econ Department at Royal Holloway and the EBRD and will be funded by the UK South East Network for Social Sciences.

Prof. Caprio recommends: “Valuing Nature: Whales, Elephants, and the Global Economy”

Prof. Caprio recommends: “Valuing Nature: Whales, Elephants, and the Global Economy”

Announcement: (NEUDC) 2020 is happening virtually this weekend (06/11/2020 – 07/11/2020)

The North East Universities Development Consortium Conference is happening virtually this weekend. It is begin hosted by Dartmouth College’s Department of Economics and the John Sloan Dickey Center for International Understanding.

Prof. Bakija recommends two resources: Goats and Soda and Rough Translation

Interested in how the developing world is doing? Here are two very good resources from the National Public Radio (NPR) covering various current developments in the developing world. Goats and Soda.

Latin America and Caribbean.

Prof. Caprio recommends this report: Sound Banks for Healthy Economies Challenges for Policymakers in Latin America and the Caribbean in Times of Coronavirus

This A CGD-IDB Working Group Report explores some of the ways in which policy makers in Latin America and the Caribbean can mitigate the adverse economic consequences of Covid-19.

Poverty

Prof. Caprio recommends this book: Randomized Control Trials in the Field of Development

For those interested in RCTs, this Oxford University Press book looks like a must read. It explores the types of questions that can and cannot be answered by RCTs and the ways in which one can employ it in the field to answer numerous kinds of questions.