About

ABOUT

Catherine B. Stroud

Dr. Catherine B. Stroud

Williams College

I completed bachelors degrees in French and Psychology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. In 2009, I received my PhD in Clinical Psychology at Stony Brook University after completing an APA-accredited predoctoral clinical psychology internship at the University of Wisconsin, Department of Psychiatry. Subsequently, I served as a research and clinical postdoctoral fellow at the Family Institute at Northwestern University.

Currently, I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Williams College. My research focuses on the origins and consequences of depression. In particular, I examine the interface between depression and the social environment, exploring reciprocal associations between stress, interpersonal relationships and depression. I am advancing three lines of work on this topic. First, I examine an array of factors that influence the stress-depression association, including prior depression, emotion regulation, personality, genetic vulnerabilities, and regulation of stress-related physiological systems. More specifically, I examine how these factors render individuals more sensitive to interpersonal stress, and in turn, more likely to generate interpersonal stress. Second, I investigate the role of interpersonal relationships (as both risk and protective factors) in the development of depression and other forms of psychopathology, as well as factors that contribute to the health of interpersonal relationships. Finally, I explore the interpersonal, biological, and psychological underpinnings of factors implicated in the development of depression and psychopathology. I examine these questions in children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families.

Kate_for_Work

Recent Work

See more on under "publications"

Overestimating Self-Blame for Stressful Life Events and Adolescents' Latent Trait Cortisol: The Moderating Role of Parental Warmth.

Stroud, C. B., Chen, F. R., Curzi, B.E.*, Granger, D. A., & Doane, L. D. (in press). Overestimating Self-Blame for Stressful Life Events and Adolescents’ Latent Trait Cortisol: The Moderating Role of Parental Warmth. Journal of Youth and Adolescence. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01112-0. PDF available here.

Serotonergic Multilocus Genetic Variation Moderates the Association Between Major Interpersonal Stress and Adolescent Depression: Replication and Candidate Environment Specification.

Starr, L.R., Vrshek-Schallhorn, S., & Stroud, C. B. (in press). Serotonergic Multilocus Genetic Variation Moderates the Association Between Major Interpersonal Stress and Adolescent Depression: Replication and Candidate Environment Specification. Journal of Psychiatric Research. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.06.020. PDF available here.

The Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR) Interacts with Acute Interpersonal Stress to Prospectively Predict Depressive Symptoms Among Early Adolescent Girls.

Stroud, C.B., Vrshek-Schallhorn, S., Norkett, E. M.*, & Doane, L. D. (in press). The Cortisol Awakening Response (CAR) Interacts with Acute Interpersonal Stress to Prospectively Predict Depressive Symptoms Among Early Adolescent Girls. Psychoneuroendocrinology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2019.04.017. PDF available here.