Peer Health

Measure Your Stress

One way to measure the amount of stress in your life is to examine the demanding events which have occurred to you recently. On the following scale, you can determine your “stress score” by adding up the number of points corresponding to the events which you have experiences in the past 6 months or expect to experience in the coming 6 months.

Stress Score

  1. Death of a close family member = 100
  2. Death of a close friend= 73
  3. Divorce between parents= 65
  4. Jail term = 63
  5. Major personal injury = 63
  6. Marriage = 58
  7. Fired from job= 50
  8. Failed important course = 47
  9. Change in health of a family member= 45
  10. Pregnancy= 44
  11. Sex problems = 44
  12. Serious argument with family member= 40
  13. Change in financial status= 39
  14. Change of major= 39
  15. Trouble with parents = 39
  16. New girl- or boyfriend = 38
  17. Increased workload at school= 37
  18. Outstanding personal achievement = 36
  19. First semester at college= 35
  20. Change in living conditions = 31
  21. Serious argument with instructor = 30
  22. Lower grades than expected= 29
  23. Change in sleeping habits= 29
  24. Change in social habits= 29
  25. Change in eating habits = 28
  26. Chronic ear trouble = 26
  27. Change in number of family get-togethers = 26
  28. Too many missed classes = 25
  29. Change of college = 24
  30. Dropped more than one class = 23
  31. Minor traffic violation = 20

Add up your total stress score. The higher your stress score, the higher your present stress level. If you score over 150, then you may need help managing the stress in your life. Help can come from your friends as well as from psychologists on staff at the Health Center or from the Peer Health office.